Radstats 2013 Conference:
Inequality and Statistics

Registrations are now being accepted for the 2013 Radical Statistics conference – Inequality and Statistics – taking place on Saturday 23 February, 2013 in York.

Please see /conference/york2013/ for further information on all speakers, topics, location, social events and registration.

Or view an A4 flyer to post or distribute at /conf2013/A4Flyer.pdf

Programme highlights:

Jonathan Bradshaw: The Legacy of Rowntree

Danny Dorling:The 2011 Census: What surprises are emerging and how they show that cancellation is stupid

Ben Baumberg and Robert de Vries: Statistical Catfights and the ‘Spirit Level’

Stewart Lansley: Inequality: It’s role in the crash and the crisis

…and much, much more!

Radical Statistics Issue 107 – Editorial

This issue of Radical Statistics comes out of the February 2012 Radical Statistics Conference, which was held at the British Library in London. The conference focused on the Mis-Measurement of Health and Wealth and was the best ever attended Radical Statistics conference. Five of the eight presentations given at the conference are collected here (we hope to include the remaining three presentations in some form in a future issue of Radical Statistics).1 As a set, the papers published here are very much in the radical statistics tradition: they do not simply critique mainstream methods of measuring, but also reveal the social necessity of challenging such measures and begin to propose alternatives.

The issue begins with Howard Reed’s critique of the ways that UK debt statistics are constructed and interpreted. He unpicks the UK Coalition Government’s ‘maxed-out credit card’ explanation of current government finances, and demonstrates the links between this reading of the data and the ‘austerity’ policies which are responsible for slowing growth in GDP (and therefore exacerbating the debt/GDP ratio). Howard also points out that contrary to popular opinion, the previous Labour government’s real spending was very much in line with historical precedent. Continue reading